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Rhyolite Ghost Town & the Oddity Next To It

On our drive back from exploring abandoned Goldfield, we made a quick detour to the ghost town of Rhyolite just on the eastern edge of Death Valley National Park. Rhyolite is about a 10 minute drive from the town of Beatty, Nevada, which seems to serve as a gassing up point for those heading to or from Las Vegas.

We too, were on our way back to Las Vegas, and were actually hoping to get to our hotel resort for some kayaking on Lake Las Vegas but our nerdy-side won out and we couldn’t pass up on seeing the Rhyolite historical site.

Abandoned caboose train in Rhyolite Ghost Town near Death Valley National Park in Nevada - American Expeditioners http://americanexpeditioners.com/rhyolite-ghost-town
A caboose formerly used as a gas station.

Abandoned caboose train in Rhyolite Ghost Town near Death Valley National Park in Nevada - American Expeditioners http://americanexpeditioners.com/rhyolite-ghost-town

Rhyolite started in January of 1905 as a two-man camp. By June later that year, Rhyolite had grown to encompass 50 saloons, 19 lodging houses, 16 restaurants, 6 barbers, a public bath house, and a weekly newspaper. By 1907, it could boast of concrete sidewalks, electricity, and telephone lines. It was not too long after, however, that ore production declined. By 1910 there were only 675 residents. By 1916, the power was cut and the electricity lines were removed. In 1922, only one resident remained, a 92-year-old man who died in 1924.

Rhyolite Ghost Town near Death Valley National Park in Nevada - American Expeditioners http://americanexpeditioners.com/rhyolite-ghost-town
Former train station.

Abandoned Rhyolite Ghost Town near Death Valley National Park in Nevada - American Expeditioners http://americanexpeditioners.com/rhyolite-ghost-town

Abandoned Rhyolite Ghost Town near Death Valley National Park in Nevada - American Expeditioners http://americanexpeditioners.com/rhyolite-ghost-town
Many of the remaining buildings of Rhyolite were sourced as building materials for the town of Beatty.

Abandoned Rhyolite Ghost Town near Death Valley National Park in Nevada - American Expeditioners http://americanexpeditioners.com/rhyolite-ghost-town
John S. Cook & Co. Bank building was once four stories. The second floor served as Dr. Jewett’s Office, the third floor was used by various brokerages, and the basement was the Rhyolite Post Office.

Abandoned Rhyolite Ghost Town near Death Valley National Park in Nevada - American Expeditioners http://americanexpeditioners.com/rhyolite-ghost-town
The off-roading chauffeur! 😉

Abandoned Rhyolite Ghost Town near Death Valley National Park in Nevada - American Expeditioners http://americanexpeditioners.com/rhyolite-ghost-town
Overbury building and Bishop Jewely Store.

Abandoned Rhyolite Ghost Town near Death Valley National Park in Nevada - American Expeditioners http://americanexpeditioners.com/rhyolite-ghost-town

Abandoned Rhyolite Ghost Town near Death Valley National Park in Nevada - American Expeditioners http://americanexpeditioners.com/rhyolite-ghost-town
HD & LD Porter Mercantile, founded by the Porter Brothers who arrived from Randsburg, California (now also a ghost town). Their slogan was, “We handle all good things but whiskey.”

Abandoned Rhyolite Ghost Town near Death Valley National Park in Nevada - American Expeditioners http://americanexpeditioners.com/rhyolite-ghost-town

Abandoned school building in Rhyolite Ghost Town near Death Valley National Park in Nevada - American Expeditioners http://americanexpeditioners.com/rhyolite-ghost-town
Abandoned school building in Rhyolite Ghost Town near Death Valley National Park in Nevada - American Expeditioners http://americanexpeditioners.com/rhyolite-ghost-town
The remains of Rhyolite’s two-story, eight-room school building.

Abandoned Rhyolite Ghost Town near Death Valley National Park in Nevada - American Expeditioners http://americanexpeditioners.com/rhyolite-ghost-town

Abandoned Rhyolite Ghost Town near Death Valley National Park in Nevada - American Expeditioners http://americanexpeditioners.com/rhyolite-ghost-town
Abandoned Rhyolite Ghost Town near Death Valley National Park in Nevada - American Expeditioners http://americanexpeditioners.com/rhyolite-ghost-town
Abandoned Rhyolite Ghost Town near Death Valley National Park in Nevada - American Expeditioners http://americanexpeditioners.com/rhyolite-ghost-town
Abandoned Rhyolite Ghost Town near Death Valley National Park in Nevada - American Expeditioners http://americanexpeditioners.com/rhyolite-ghost-town
Abandoned Rhyolite Ghost Town near Death Valley National Park in Nevada - American Expeditioners http://americanexpeditioners.com/rhyolite-ghost-town
If you couldn’t tell from the bars over the windows, this building served as the town jail.

Cemetery near the Abandoned Rhyolite Ghost Town near Death Valley National Park in Nevada - American Expeditioners http://americanexpeditioners.com/rhyolite-ghost-town

Next to the Rhyolite Ghost Town is the Goldwell Open Air Museum. We didn’t stay long to ponder the art but there were quite a few odd sculptures. Details about them, including a giant naked lady that was clearly designed by a man, can be found at the Goldwell Open Air Museum website.

Abandoned Rhyolite Ghost Town near Death Valley National Park in Nevada - American Expeditioners http://americanexpeditioners.com/rhyolite-ghost-town
Abandoned Rhyolite Ghost Town near Death Valley National Park in Nevada - American Expeditioners http://americanexpeditioners.com/rhyolite-ghost-town
Abandoned Rhyolite Ghost Town near Death Valley National Park in Nevada - American Expeditioners http://americanexpeditioners.com/rhyolite-ghost-town
Abandoned Rhyolite Ghost Town near Death Valley National Park in Nevada - American Expeditioners http://americanexpeditioners.com/rhyolite-ghost-town
Ghost statues of the the Last Supper sculpture by Albert Szukalski at the Goldwell Open Air Museum near the Abandoned Rhyolite Ghost Town near Death Valley National Park in Nevada - American Expeditioners http://americanexpeditioners.com/rhyolite-ghost-town
The Last Supper sculpture by Albert Szukalski.

Rhyolite Ghost Town Overview

  • Coordinates: 36.903889, -116.829167
  • Fees: FREE
  • Difficulty: Easy dirt road
  • Usage: Moderate
  • Pets allowed: Yes
Tags : miningnevada ghost towns